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  • HD for digital signage?

    Most folks I talk to in the digital signage market tend to not be that excited about HD. After all, most flat panel displays in public spaces like retail stores are relatively far from the viewer, so that HD resolution would be kind of overkill.
    Info-heavy signage, such as in airports might be the exception... but logic tells me that it's only a matter of time... isn't it foolish to assume that one market will defy all others, and stay stuck in Standard Definition??

    Sony has been floating 4K resolution at trade shows for several years, and at their booth at the CES Show last month, the most impressive new technology for my book was a 4K resolution LCD panel. Is 4K necessary for commercial AV-installed boardrooms, or for digital signage? Never say never. Case in point: Sony’s demo had the 4K panel showing, in one segment, four 1080P images on one screen– it was spectacular.

    Are we going toward HD displays in the digital signage space?

    David Keene
    Exective Editor, Digital Signage magazine

  • #2
    1080p

    I did a post the other day on my blog about this.

    http://screenmedia.wordpress.com/200...s-1080p-thing/

    I must admit I don't know what 4K is, but do know 1080P is not something most network operators actually need.

    Dave Haynes

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    • #3
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      • #4
        Originally posted by DKeene View Post
        Most folks I talk to in the digital signage market tend to not be that excited about HD. After all, most flat panel displays in public spaces like retail stores are relatively far from the viewer, so that HD resolution would be kind of overkill.
        Info-heavy signage, such as in airports might be the exception... but logic tells me that it's only a matter of time... isn't it foolish to assume that one market will defy all others, and stay stuck in Standard Definition??
        I think you are probably right about that. Considering that Congress is requiring all TV to be HD, it wouldn't surprise me if the entire country is HD in another 5-10 years. People can still play LPs, but there aren't too many people producing them any more. All the classics are now converted to CD. I think when new technologies are introduced there is a natural initial backlash from people of a conservative mindset that it isn't necessary, but eventually they come around.

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        • #5
          HD is maybe way too HARD?

          It is interesting to note the observations that "most folks in the digital signage market tend not to be that excited about HD". Many within the industry are in fact, grappling with how actually to manage and present content in HD. For many, feigned lack of interest is actually quaking fear that the market will soon realise that they can't. Many contemporary delivery technologies are simply unable to scale up to met the demands of 1080p and if they do they present such a drain on the delivery PC's CPU as to make it all very risky and problematic.
          Whether or not the industry wants 1080 or not it is the audience who calls the shots. When your LCD or plasma at home is capable of presenting 1080 dazzling and brilliantly sharp lines, then what sort of impression is digital signage going to make in the marketplace if it can only display pixelated, jittery mush?
          The very idea that Standard Definition will somehow suffice is as ludicrous as the concept of pumping endless, mindless advertising loops into an environment and expecting it to attract and maintain a target audience's attention. The future lies in engagement and offering something back to the target market in exchange for their time and attention. Give them rich, fluid, engaging and yes, beautiful imagery and you'll get them back to watch again and again just to see what's on next. Give an audience fuzzy dross and they'll ignore you forever. All hail 1080 bling!
          The answer is very clear! HD is the future. Intelligent and stimulating content is the key. The digital signage industry just better shake off this feigned complacency and move on up to meet the new standards.
          Last edited by TonyBoy; 04-17-2008, 12:43 AM.

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          • #6
            Well, as someone who does a lot of work with Consumer Electronics retailers, I can tell you that there is one digital signage application that literally requires HD and these days 1080P content.

            Digital Signage networks for demonstrating HDTV's. These days most every CE retailer has a networked based system for managing and distributing the content that plays on their in-store TV's. Most have migrated to at least 1080i over analog component video cables, and more and more are migrating to 1080p over HDMI.

            Back in 2001 when we first started dealing with HDTV's we were using $10,000 servers with Sencore ATSC cards, now we can use dedicated media players that are far better and just cost a few hundred bucks.

            Jason
            retailgeek.com

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            • #7
              HDMI distribution

              Thanks for that info. Its interesting that the retailers are using ATSC with video servers for displaying demoing HDTV performance. Clever.

              I am using a 8 port HDMI splitter which is essentially a HDMI distribution amp or HDMI splitter and can directly distribute HDMI from HDMI so standard HDMI sources such as Blu Ray players can be used instead of servers.



              Originally posted by retailgeek View Post
              Well, as someone who does a lot of work with Consumer Electronics retailers, I can tell you that there is one digital signage application that literally requires HD and these days 1080P content.

              Digital Signage networks for demonstrating HDTV's. These days most every CE retailer has a networked based system for managing and distributing the content that plays on their in-store TV's. Most have migrated to at least 1080i over analog component video cables, and more and more are migrating to 1080p over HDMI.

              Back in 2001 when we first started dealing with HDTV's we were using $10,000 servers with Sencore ATSC cards, now we can use dedicated media players that are far better and just cost a few hundred bucks.

              Jason
              retailgeek.com

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              • #8
                Originally posted by cdanddvdpublisher View Post
                ... Considering that Congress is requiring all TV to be HD...
                No, Congress is requiring all TV to be "digital", not "HD". As someone who has installed many Digital Signage systems for both small an large businesses, HDTV is the standard. At any distance the image is clearer, sharper, and you're using computer graphics, that are better than HD quality to start with.

                We shoot and edit everything HD, our clients love it, and it makes a great impression on their target clients. Going SD at this point in time sells everyone short. We use Mac Mini's and inexpensive software, and the HD signal is handeled just fine.

                I see installing SDTV for digital signage as a step backwards. The overwhelming installed Digital Signage base today is HDTV. And the visual quality at ANY distance is dramaticlly better than an SD unit.
                Digital Media Instructor for
                Louisiana State University & Delgado College

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