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How to create & run a backup system from external firewire?

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  • How to create & run a backup system from external firewire?

    I am trying to create a backup system (OS & Apps) on an external firewire drive, for my MacPro, in the event I have a primary drive crash. I just ran a test of the external backup system and it failed. Here is what I did -- _can anyone point out to me where I went wrong_?

    *HERE IS HOW I CREATED THE BACKUP SYSTEM EXTERNAL DRIVE:*I took a Lacie 200GB external fw drive and using Disk Utility, I created 2 partitions. Partion #1 is 180GB to hold the OSsystem&apps. Partion #2 is 4GB to archive documents.

    I created the system partition using GUID partion scheme, formatted extended, journaled.

    I then clicked open the MacHD, selected all, and dragged and dropped all the folders into the partion #1.

    HERE IS HOW I RAN A TEST ON THE BACKUP DRIVE:
    I started up the MacPro holding down the option key, and on screen I saw both the MacHD and the firewire drive -- I believe it was labeled EII or some such (not the name I gave it). I selected the firewire drive and got a symbol for "no" -- a circle with a diagonal bar through it -- however, the computer then started up on the MacHD.

    Can anybody pick out where I made a wrong turn here?

    MACPRO Mac OS X (10.4.2)

  • #2
    Originally posted by bbotula View Post

    Can anybody pick out where I made a wrong turn here?

    MACPRO Mac OS X (10.4.2)
    In a nutshell, I would not approach this in this manner but would rather install a secondary SATA drive (you should have at least one data drive internal anyway BTW) and use Carbon Copy Cloner to copy the boot drive. Then test to see if you can boot off that drive. Take that out and put somewhere safe. But i've got to tell you, and I've been a Mac user since 1984, I've never bothered to do something like this. You always want to make sure you keep documents separate from the system drive (within reason), back up all the data that is fit for backup, keep your install disks findable in case of a non-recoverable crash and get to work.
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    Eric Peterson (AKA, "Zwick")
    Person in charge
    Content creation/Education
    http://www.ericnp.net

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    • #3
      If you can wait a little longer Time Machine in Leopard will do this sort of stuff for you automatically.

      Noah
      GH2, GoPro HD, AC160, Canon EOS 5D Mark II and Canon 7D training at www.CallBoxLive.com
      40% discount for 2-poppers! Use code 2pop2012 on these titles.

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      • #4
        Originally posted by Zwick View Post
        In a nutshell, I would not approach this in this manner but would rather install a secondary SATA drive (you should have at least one data drive internal anyway BTW) and use Carbon Copy Cloner to copy the boot drive. Then test to see if you can boot off that drive. Take that out and put somewhere safe. But i've got to tell you, and I've been a Mac user since 1984, I've never bothered to do something like this. You always want to make sure you keep documents separate from the system drive (within reason), back up all the data that is fit for backup, keep your install disks findable in case of a non-recoverable crash and get to work.
        Zwick, thanks again for sharing your experience. I am bent upon "cloning", duplicating, backing up, what-ever-you-wanna-call-it, my system because of a trail of woes I will not bore you with. The ability to be able to get back where I was on my system before the last update/install/tech support advice, is key to me. That said, I hear you -- the discs are always there.

        In any event, what I learned on the Apple Support Forum is this: You cannot drag and drop you system. You must go throught Disk Utilities and select Restore. The trick is -- you "restore" your MacHD system to your back-up disk. Its a little confusing because what you are really doing is "duplicating" or "cloning" or "copying", but the tool/choice within Disk Utilities is called "Restore". The Big Heads Up is that you must be sure that you don't accidently "Restore" your empty back-up drive to your MacHD -- or you will end up with no system at all.

        As for Carbon Copy Cloner -- do you use it? And if so - for what purpose (since you don't back up your system)?

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        • #5
          I know people who have had success with CC Cloner for this purpose.

          But Noah hit the nail on the head with Time Machine. That's October. Time machine will do it all for the cost of a drive.

          http://www.apple.com/macosx/leopard/...memachine.html
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          Eric Peterson (AKA, "Zwick")
          Person in charge
          Content creation/Education
          http://www.ericnp.net

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