Announcement

Collapse
No announcement yet.

One more newbie question: why and which external monitors to use?

Collapse
X
 
  • Filter
  • Time
  • Show
Clear All
new posts

  • One more newbie question: why and which external monitors to use?

    Hi all again,

    I was shooting some footage and throwing in on Avid and noticed lots of grainy image (from Canon XH A1) on the FullScreen preview in Avid. I googled the settings and tried changing them on my camera - it helped to some extent. Here's my question now: when shooting w/ my camera, what kind of external monitor should I connect to see the detail of the grainy image so that I can fix it there on the spot? I tried connecting my LCD TV via video-out and the image looked clean while the same image on Avid looks grainy. What's the problem here, avid or that LCD? If the LCD, what kind of external monitor should I get for my camera? And while we're at it, why are mini-DV players so expensive?

    Thanks again and sorry for the length but once I started playing with this I am just flooding myself with questions.

  • #2
    I'd use a CRT monitor in the field, like a Sony 8 or 9". Unfortunately, CRTs are no longer being made. CRT field monitors can be obtained from rental houses, or found used online (be very careful). Make sure you get a good shade for it. If you're shooting outdoors, sunlight will wash out any monitor and not let you see what's really happening.

    I'm not familiar with your specific camera model. It's possible that what you see on a monitor is not what's being recorded. I'd do several tests under controlled conditions to see if what the monitor shows is what's being recorded versus what the lens is seeing. Once a signal is recorded to DV tape, it's compressed 5:1. The lens doesn't do that, recording it to tape does that. You need to know if you are monitoring the lens or the tape.

    What do you mean by expensive? I'll spare you the entire "When I got into the business it was really expensive" spiel, but the gist of it is that equipment costs have plummeted in the last 15 years and the ability to get good quality for a much more reasonable price has gone up and up and up. What I can do in my office now used to take a $750,000 online edit suite to accomplish when I first started out. Needless to say, I've spent significantly less than that building my edit system. Less than 10% of that, so far (I still have a little ways to go.)

    A couple grand for a decent DV deck? Peanuts, I say! Before the recent upheaval of the old video guard, you'd not have the opportunity to do what you do on the level that you can without mortgaging the house, taking out a huge loan, raiding the kids' college funds AND draining the retirement account. These days most only have to pick one.

    Sorry if that's not the answer you were hoping for. Good gear costs good money. If I fret about the expense of a new piece of gear in just the right way, I usually find that it pays for itself within a few projects that I would not have been able to do without that piece of gear. I have a video deck here in my office that cost more than my first new car! Two months after it arrived I got a call from a client I'd not had the opportunity to speak with since I'd acquired the new gear. He didn't know I could capture from Digital Beta sources. He started going over the details of a new project he wanted me to edit for him. He had the box of elements in front of him as he was talking to me. All of a sudden he said, "Oh, wait, you don't have a Digital Beta deck, do you? A lot of this is file footage archived onto Digital Beta. You might not be able to do this one, I'm sorry...", to which I joyously responded with, "I can capture Digital Beta right here, as of the last month or so! Send me your big blue tapes, man!!". That project didn't bring in the entire cost of the deck, but it was about half. That one took a little longer to pay for itself. About 18 months or so...

    It's a different perspective, I know. The gear is much cheaper these days than a lot of folks who may be just starting out realize.

    debe

    Comment


    • #3
      The FullScreen preview in the Avid isn't really an accurrate check of footage, but not saying that it might not still be the footage. If you are connecting a quality LCD monitor, that should give you an accurrate representation of what you should expect. You shouldn't be doing shading based on the LCD monitor, but if set right, can give you a good idea of what you are capturing.

      A simple test is to simply digitize the footage into your Avid and then export it back to tape. Put the tape in your camera and hook it up to the LCD monitor again. It should look comparable to the source material. Identical if you don't transcode it.


      Originally posted by lecterielin View Post
      Hi all again,

      I was shooting some footage and throwing in on Avid and noticed lots of grainy image (from Canon XH A1) on the FullScreen preview in Avid. I googled the settings and tried changing them on my camera - it helped to some extent. Here's my question now: when shooting w/ my camera, what kind of external monitor should I connect to see the detail of the grainy image so that I can fix it there on the spot? I tried connecting my LCD TV via video-out and the image looked clean while the same image on Avid looks grainy. What's the problem here, avid or that LCD? If the LCD, what kind of external monitor should I get for my camera? And while we're at it, why are mini-DV players so expensive?

      Thanks again and sorry for the length but once I started playing with this I am just flooding myself with questions.

      Comment

      Footer

      Collapse
      Working...
      X