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  • alternate file for DVD playback on PCs?

    hi All-
    Have a client whose PCs, of various vintages, will not playback the SOUND off a DVDPro-burned "TV" format (m2v-type) DVD. They are requesting an alternate file-type burned to DVD, suggesting .avi or .mpeg (tho they didn't say what KIND of mpeg!)

    Using Compressor, can someone recommend a setting/file type that will play in PC computers off a DVD? Presumably without having to copy the file onto the desktop, etc.

    Details:
    4min SD video with stereo produced in FCS2
    Thanks
    Stu Aull
    Alaska

  • #2
    An authored DVD IS MPEG-2 with either AIFF or AC3 audio. It's not a DVD if it is not MPEG-2. You can only make a data DVD using the formats you're asking about. What did you use to encode the audio, AIFF or AC3? If you used AIFF it just might be too cumbersome for the PCs to playback. Also, burned DVDs are notorious for having problems in various devices.
    sigpic
    Eric Peterson (AKA, "Zwick")
    Person in charge
    Content creation/Education
    http://www.ericnp.net

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    • #3
      What do you mean TV type m2v? A .m2v file (video portion) is used along with an ACC file (audio portion) to "author" a DVD, that then gets a "build", then burned to a DVD, at which point there's no .m2v file anymore.

      You may want to just give them an H.264 file, cause just burning a .m2v file to a DVD is pretty useless.

      File > Export > Using QuickTime Convertion. Then do H.264, medium quality, all rates at Automatic, frame rate same as original, you'll be fine.
      Digital Media Instructor for
      Louisiana State University & Delgado College

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      • #4
        You guys!
        Thanks for info-
        Zwick, your right, I am using .aiffs - will try a diff audio type as suggested.
        Didn't realize .aiff file "carried thru" - thought the DVDPro spit it out as something else anyway

        Ben
        sorry, mentioned "m2v" so everyone would understand I am using a standard TV-type DVD format. I realize the m2v is the video portion of the burn.
        hate to use H264 because the render times in Compressor are
        1) absolutely G-L-A-C-I-A-L and
        2) compressors look of h264 stuff never really impressed me - noisy.
        'course I could be doing something wrong!!

        regards
        Stu Aull
        Alaska

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        • #5
          My H.264 encodes always look fantastic. I'd question what you're doing with the encode settings.
          http://slfcpug.ning.com/video/1975320:Video:4903

          My comment about .m2v files on a video DVD are that there is not .m2v "file" on a properly built DVD, although it is MPEG-2 format. But nothing has a .m2v file extension. Very different things.

          Big question, what brand of DVD media are you using? Some brands are notorious, some are really good for compatibility. And computer software DVD players are the worst for compatibility. Try it on a set top player, and if it works fine, blame Windows. (can't resist) Or at least you can say it plays in a "real" DVD player.

          But again, H.264 encodes for me (FCS2) are constantly beautiful. We use them on our digital signage systems full rez, full screen, 720HD all the time and they're wonderful. I'd double check your encoding settings.
          Last edited by BenB; 06-11-2009, 07:37 AM.
          Digital Media Instructor for
          Louisiana State University & Delgado College

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          • #6
            It's been a while since I dabbled with compressor (I'm on PC at home and my current job, and haven't had steady usage with FCS2 since last year), but AIFF should have nothing to do with computer playback. It is equivalent to LPCM audio (merely rewrapped if anything) on DVDs, and if anything, should be EASIER to decode for an older PC (in terms of compatibility anyway).

            If the client is using commercial DVD software, it *has* to support AC3 and LPCM, so this shouldn't even be an issue. MPEG audio (MP2) is another option, though this is technically not mandated for NTSC DVD spec (though pretty much universally playable anyway).

            As for H264, I'd recommend it myself, but if you're truly concerned about this client's supposedly old PC, you may want to avoid H264 for the sake of decoding speed.. It's not exactly friendly - even in SD resolutions - with older computers.

            Clearly, going back to your post, they only seem to require a data disc. I usually discourage the usage of the old MPEG1 codec (and presumed MPEG audio), but if they want it, then so be it. It IS highly compatible, albeit extremely outdated and inefficient. Look into Handbrake and FFMPEGx if you're curious about AVIs, though beware they may not have proper decoders to handle the various codecs (particularly MPEG4 ASP based).

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            • #7
              Using AIFF as opposed to AC3 often causes playback issues. AIFF datarates are usually much higher. Although he is saying audio is playing back and there is no video. Probelms with AIFF authored DVDs are typically studdering audio on playback. What's the total bitrate encode for the DVD? Still, could be the optical drive or software player just not liking a burned DVD.

              EDIT: As far as all these other ideas go, why not just make them a disk with WMV files and be done with it? I'm sure their Windows machines will be happy with that.
              Last edited by Zwick; 06-11-2009, 10:27 AM.
              sigpic
              Eric Peterson (AKA, "Zwick")
              Person in charge
              Content creation/Education
              http://www.ericnp.net

              Comment


              • #8
                Originally posted by Zwick View Post
                Using AIFF as opposed to AC3 often causes playback issues. AIFF datarates are usually much higher. Although he is saying audio is playing back and there is no video. Probelms with AIFF authored DVDs are typically studdering audio on playback. What's the total bitrate encode for the DVD? Still, could be the optical drive or software player just not liking a burned DVD.

                EDIT: As far as all these other ideas go, why not just make them a disk with WMV files and be done with it? I'm sure their Windows machines will be happy with that.
                Good point on WMV, though AIFF's higher bitrate is of course due to it being uncompressed (1536kbps) Actually come to think of it, a spec-legal DVD cannot exceed a particular combined bitrate - last I checked, around 9Mbits due to overhead - due to hardware limitations. Of course, this is irrelevant for a software based player which can obviously break spec, though it'd be sad if the computer is simply that slow. I would imagine the processing required to decode AC3 would be a similar workload, hence promoting LPCM before, but so be it. Try AC3, and if that fails, WMV sounds like a compatible option.

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                • #9
                  H.264 has worked on every PC my clients have played them on. Flash Player supports it fully now.

                  Computer software DVD players have been known for a very long time to be much worse at playing back DVDs than set top players, as they are doing an emulation of hardware, they are not actual hardware decoders.

                  Buy Flip4Mac, be done with it.
                  Digital Media Instructor for
                  Louisiana State University & Delgado College

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                  • #10
                    Thanks Guys - all great posts and info-
                    I have re-encoded audio with AC3 and so far (!?!?) client has NOT called back with issues! Yay! Certainly smaller file (6Mb vs 48Mb) than comparable AIFF file was.
                    Overall bitrate burn on my DVDs is in the recommended (?) 6.5 rate.

                    Ben - thanks for link to your H264 tutorial!! will have to give it another shot

                    Off topic-
                    RX782...
                    any chance your "handle" relates to 1982 mazda RX7?? Just asking since am fanatic owner of 1980 SA RX7

                    Thank you all!!
                    Stu Aull
                    Alaska

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                    • #11
                      Originally posted by 7aull View Post
                      Off topic-
                      RX782...
                      any chance your "handle" relates to 1982 mazda RX7?? Just asking since am fanatic owner of 1980 SA RX7
                      Sorry to disappoint, being the nerd that I am, it's the model number for the original Gundam mech in the anime series Mobile Suit Gundam.

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